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Aerospace in Mexico

Mexico has consolidated itself as a global leader in the aerospace industry. During the period from 2006 to 2012, exports registered an average annual growth of over 16%, and in 2013, reached $5.463 billion dollars. On the other hand, imports totaled $4.412 billion dollars, maintaining a positive commercial balance for 2013.

In Mexico, there are 267 companies and supporting organizations, most of them have NADCAP and AS9100 certifications. These companies and supporting organizations are located in 18 states and, according to estimates by the Mexican Federation of the Aerospace Industry, employed over 34,000 employees in 2013.

Mexico’s Aerospace Industry’s Strengths

Logistics

One of the main reasons that explain Mexico’s aeronautic industry growth is its geographic location, by being next to the United States and Canada, two of the main aerospace developers; this opens technological and industrial integration opportunities with the main hubs, Quebec and Seattle.
Additionally, the market’s access to the Asian and European markets positions Mexico as America’s aerospace logistic and manufacturing center.

Experience

Mexico’s experience and success in developing the automobile and electro-electronic sectors bring an advanced manufacture and infrastructure platform; favoring the development of the country’s aerospace industry and permitting the optimization of the supply chain, common support systems, and synergetic advantages.

Reliability

The Mexican export control system was evaluated by countries belonging to the Wassenaar Accord. Mexico was an outstanding participant as it was admitted in record time; which should be recognized because over the previous five years, no new members was approved. Mexico’s admission shows international interest in the country as a trustworthy destination for the integration of sensitive technology. As a result of being accepted into this prestigious group, Mexico has committed itself to remaining a sure destination for the production of goods and services that include restricted technologies as well as goods and services that are used daily.

Competitive Costs

According to a study by KPMG, Mexico is 15.7% more cost competitive than the United States.

Innovation

A large number of universities and investigation centers focusing on advanced manufacturing and materials favor the development of innovation projects in the sector.

Talent

According to CONACYT estimations, in 2012, 111,400 students graduated in engineering and technology. 2010 UNESCO data shows that in Mexico there are 18% more manufacture engineering and construction graduates per capita than in the United States.

Certified Quality

Mexico is one of the few countries holding a mutual bilateral recognition of aeronautic-BASA (Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement) system certification with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). On their behalf, companies have certified their processes according to the industry’s standards; these being, ISO 9001, AS 9100 and NADCAP.

Mexico has consolidated itself as a global leader in the aerospace industry. During the period from 2006 to 2012, exports registered an average annual growth of over 16%, and in 2013, reached $5.463 billion dollars. On the other hand, imports totaled $4.412 billion dollars, maintaining a positive commercial balance for 2013.

In Mexico, there are 267 companies and supporting organizations, most of them have NADCAP and AS9100 certifications. These companies and supporting organizations are located in 18 states and, according to estimates by the Mexican Federation of the Aerospace Industry, employed over 34,000 employees in 2013.

Mexico’s Aerospace Industry’s Strengths

Logistics

One of the main reasons that explain Mexico’s aeronautic industry growth is its geographic location, by being next to the United States and Canada, two of the main aerospace developers; this opens technological and industrial integration opportunities with the main hubs, Quebec and Seattle.

Additionally, the market’s access to the Asian and European markets positions Mexico as America’s aerospace logistic and manufacturing center.

Experience

Mexico’s experience and success in developing the automobile and electro-electronic sectors bring an advanced manufacture and infrastructure platform; favoring the development of the country’s aerospace industry and permitting the optimization of the supply chain, common support systems, and synergetic advantages.

Reliability

The Mexican export control system was evaluated by countries belonging to the Wassenaar Accord. Mexico was an outstanding participant as it was admitted in record time; which should be recognized because over the previous five years, no new members was approved. Mexico’s admission shows international interest in the country as a trustworthy destination for the integration of sensitive technology. As a result of being accepted into this prestigious group, Mexico has committed itself to remaining a sure destination for the production of goods and services that include restricted technologies as well as goods and services that are used daily.

Competitive Costs

According to a study by KPMG, Mexico is 15.7% more cost competitive than the United States.

Innovation

A large number of universities and investigation centers focusing on advanced manufacturing and materials favor the development of innovation projects in the sector.

Talent

According to CONACYT estimations, in 2012, 111,400 students graduated in engineering and technology. 2010 UNESCO data shows that in Mexico there are 18% more manufacture engineering and construction graduates per capita than in the United States.

Certified Quality

Mexico is one of the few countries holding a mutual bilateral recognition of aeronautic-BASA (Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement) system certification with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). On their behalf, companies have certified their processes according to the industry’s standards; these being, ISO 9001, AS 9100 and NADCAP.

Structure of the Aerospace industry

The Mexican Federation of the Aerospace Industry (FEMIA ) predicts that Mexico’s exports in the sector will reach an estimated $7 billion dollars by 2015.

structure

Among the principal manufacturing activities, there is part and component fabrication, harnesses, piece assemblage, security equipment, as well as plane and helicopter fuselage assembling. With regard to the industrial reparation and maintenance, turbine and plane motor maintenance is recognized; and in engineering and design, the creation of new turbine projects and composite materials is being contemplated.

Roadmap

This Roadmap, developed by a workgroup made up of public, private and academic institutions through the ProMexico economic development office of the Economy Ministry of Mexico, is planned in two phases, with the priority being established according to the importance of each of the strategic projects. In a first phase, projects that were identified as high impact and feasible for the development of the aerospace industry in Baja California were worked on.